Friday, July 3, 2020

Goodbye COVID-19? Antibodies that could kill the coronavirus

The COVID-19 does not have any treatment and continues to keep the world shut. The economies of various countries have been badly hit. The entire world has come to a halt. One who catches it is highly unsure of whether his death is near or whether he’ll end up with a severe case of the disease. The medical scientists of the entire world have collaborated and dedicated themselves to finding a solution for this grave threat to humanity.

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The precursor vaccine

Until now, the only solution to this virus has been self-isolation, maybe blood thinners, and even remdesivir. The vaccine has not been developed yet. There’s a ray of hope in the vaccine candidates which have tested positive in the labs. However, it is conspicuous that lab tests may not always prove to be consistent with humans. Two separate teams have claimed to recognize the antibody, which fights the coronavirus. They claim promising results, even when tested on humans. So the big news: these can be converted to drugs and maybe available worldwide very soon.

Contribution by countries

The patients whose bodies could not produce antibodies against the virus and had a weaker immune system were provided with a solution. Plasma therapy, which has been used for hundreds of years several treatments, was used for these kinds of patients. This showed promising results too. However, it is not possible to use the therapy as a weapon for a pandemic. Researchers from the Netherlands, Israel, Japan claim to have developed antibodies that killed the coronavirus in the lab conditions. If human trials were successful, mass production of them would be made. They will then become the standard therapies for the coronavirus.

Read Also: Researcher on the verge of significant COVID-19 discovery shot dead

It is like a race between countries, as to who will find the solution to this pandemic first. Contributing to the race, a Dutch team at Utrecht University devised a monoclonal antibody called 47D11. It prevents virus replication and also helps kill the precursor of the virus. Korea and the US continue to work on the same. According to recent reports, the most promising drug might be ready by this summer.

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