Friday, July 3, 2020

Monoclonal antibodies might kill COVID-19, replace plasma therapy

Researchers around the world are trying to figure out all possible ways to fight off the pandemic. Numerous vaccine candidates and drugs are already on trial to see the effectiveness against COVID-19. However, the answer might be with the help of this possible therapy – the use of monoclonal antibodies is showing promising results against the disease.

Read Also: Bat super immunity responsible for carrying coronavirus, study says

Two independent teams from the Netherlands and Japan have developed potential monoclonal antibodies against the virus, and such antibodies have neutralized the virus in laboratory conditions. Soon, we can expect this therapy out for human trials to prove its reliability, but this is not the first time such antibodies are in use. We already saw plasma therapy using antibodies is helping affected patients worldwide. This has led to saving a number of patients from critical danger around the world. But the drawback is that this therapy cannot meet the demands on a large scale. Therefore, scientists say this alternative therapy can easily replace the conventional plasma ones in saving lives.

The Monoclonal Antibody: 47D11

The monoclonal antibody going by the name 47D11 is developed by the Dutch team is obtained from genetically modified mice infected with the disease. These antibodies directly target the spike portions in the virus, which facilitate entry and replication. Therefore, inhibiting the spike will stop the virus from spreading inside the body. Moreover, the antibodies also inhibit SARS-CoV, which are also from the same clade. Therefore, further humans trials will open boundaries about the effectiveness of this treatment.

Read Also: Intel and NVIDIA make mergers this week

Researchers from Japan have also come up with a new antibody candidate called the VHH. This component is said to serve from camelids who transmitted the MERS back in 2014. VHH is potentially easy to create because it is derived from microorganisms rather than a laboratory animal. While comparing other methods, this seems to be cost-effective with additional benefits. Although these antibodies suppress the disease, it is still unclear how long it is effective. Therefore further studies with additional clinical trials will help figure out the questions.

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

Source: BGR

Comment Below

Featured Stories

The universe is actually flat, new dark energy measurements reveal

Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth have improved the way dark energy is measured, leading to...

The Black Lives Matter Movement inspires action in online communities

With numerous protests continuing all over the United States to put a spotlight on systemic racism, police...

Latest Stories

Coronavirus-infected cells grow more branched extensions than normal, new studies reveal

A recent study published in the scientific journal Cell found that infection with the novel coronavirus can...

Breakthrough: The branched flow of light observed for the first time

Ph.D. student Anatoly (Tolik) Patsyk and postdoctoral fellow Miguel A. Bandres, from Technion - Israel Institue of...

A Jupiter-like planet was spotted near a distant star

A planet orbiting around a distant star has been spotted, and it is orbiting with breakneck speed....

Related Stories

Coronavirus-infected cells grow more branched extensions than normal, new studies reveal

A recent study published in the scientific journal Cell found that infection with the novel coronavirus can...

U.S. states in chaos as the government pulls back on reopening

A new rise in cases followed the anti-lockdown nationwide riots in the US. The COVID-19 pandemic, which...