3D Quantum Spin Liquid could change future information technologies

Quantum spin liquids have the potential to change the future of information technologies.

Today’s computing devices operate based on the process that happens within the semiconductors. The next breakthrough in computing would be Quantum computing using quantum phenomenon. Quantum spin liquid is one such candidate, the interactions between the tiny magnetic moments in the material, are referred to as spins. These are different from the conventional magnetic materials as quantum fluctuations dominate the magnetic interactions. Due to geometric constraints in the crystal lattice, the spins are forced to fluctuate, even at temperatures near absolute zero.

Two of the four magnetic interactions form a new three-dimensional network of corner-sharing triangles, known as the hyper-hyperkagome lattice, leading to the quantum spin liquid behavior in PbCuTe2O6. Image: HZB

An international team lead by Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) scientists found spin liquid behavior in three-dimensional while investigating crystals of PbCuTe2O6, with neutron experiments at ISIS, NIST, and ILL. The material PbCuTe2O6 has a three-dimensional lattice called the hyper-hyperkagome lattice.

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Simulations

Physicists Prof. Johannes Reuther from HZB measured the behavior of such a three-dimensional hyper-hyperkagome with four magnetic interactions and showed that the system exhibits quantum-spin liquid behavior with a specific magnetic energy spectrum.

Experiment

Neutrons experiments conducted at ISIS, NIST, and ILL prove the very subtle signals of this predicted spin liquid behavior. According to the first author Dr. Shravani Chillal from HZB, they were surprised that the experimental data fit exceptionally well with theoretical simulations conducted at HZB.

The finding is significant as it opens up new possibilities for future computing.

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Source: Phys.org

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