Has life stopped due to epidemics? Archaeologists say ‘no’

Has life stopped due to epidemics? Archeologists say: No, life did not stop due to outbreaks, but residents made decisions and options to live with it. Throughout its history, human society has undergone many epidemics, and archaeologists have attempted to look at the archaeological remains left by the owners of these societies. So, they began to know how these ancient people faced these diseases and epidemics through the remains of many things, such as building layouts, burial processes, funeral remains, and human skeletons.

Archaeologists in a deserted area of Ghana, Africa, have found a region where people distinguished by crops, livestock, and hunting have developed local and regional economies. It is a region that inhabited in the early 14th century (700 years ago). Scientists have found 76 sites where infants were buried, and the area had been plagued by a pandemic. Evidence shows that the settlement suddenly abandoned at the same time as these infants buried. This means that the epidemic has prompted society to shift to another region.

- Advertisement -

In central Ghana, regions: Akrokrowa-Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa, surrounded by complex trench systems, show specific archaeological evidence. After two centuries of settlement in these areas, they were suddenly abandoned, and the period of desertion seems to coincide with the epidemic of the Black Death that swept across Europe at that time. After the epidemic, homes not rebuilt again. Instead, residential communities rebuilt elsewhere. Archaeologists believe that these societies were able to manage and adapt to the epidemic. Archaeological discoveries and historical evidence have shown that these societies used a specific strategy to deal with the epidemic, such as burning old settlements and moving to good locations. Instead, social separation used by the distance between the new settlements.

Read Also: Scientists have found the oldest grain of cultivated rice in central Asia

In the late 1960s, some members of the archaeological excavation mission in the Phalaborwa region, South Africa, refused. This is due to the thirteenth century AD, and they refused to continue the work after they found that there was an accumulated mass burial dating back to eight centuries, so they feared that these graves were associated with the spread of disease. The results of archaeologists in the Mwenzi district in southern Zimbabwe also showed that touching epidemic victims prevented from dying for fear of transmitting diseases in this way.

Also, in Zimbabwe, the Shona people were isolated during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and people suffered from infectious diseases. Like leprosy in temporary housing. This means that a few people can treat patients. In some cases, corpses cremated to avoid spreading the infection.

- Advertisement -

It also revealed through archaeological evidence. African societies have adopted various epidemiological strategies. Such as burning settlements before moving homes to new locations. African indigenous knowledge systems show that the burning of settlements or forests was a well-established method of disease management.

Read Also: Apple to allow interest-free installments to buy Apple products with Apple Card

Settlement planning was also important. In areas such as Zimbabwe and parts of Mozambique, for example, settlements separated to accommodate one or two families in one place. This allowed people to stay at a distance between them and each other. Ancient African societies knew that the outbreak was unpredictable but could have occurred, so they prepared for this by building their new settlements in a separate way. These behaviors also reinforced by different diets that included fruits and other things presented as food to strengthen and strengthen the immune system.

However, perhaps most importantly. People have organized themselves in ways that facilitate living with and managing diseases, and at the same time, adhere to basic principles such as good hygiene and sanitation. This is how life did not stop due to epidemics: residents made decisions and options to live with them. Therefore, scientists and decision-makers today in countries and domestic and international health organizations can benefit from the results of archaeologists to overcome the implications of the Coruna virus.

- Advertisement -

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

Related Stories

The missing tomb of the last Queen of Egypt: Queen Cleopatra

The last queen of Egypt was Cleopatra, she killed herself with a snake bite, after the Roman...

COVID-19 kills more men than women. This may be the reason why.

When the global pandemic surpassed 200,000 globally, a striking pattern had been noticed by researchers. The fact...

Featured Stories

Venus: 10 shocking facts about our nearest planet you never knew

1. A day on Venus is longer than its year. It takes 243 Earth...

How to deal with COVID-19? A Zumba® Ambassador reveals the secret!

Keeping our mental and physical health in this difficult time has been, and it still is a...

Search for alien life among 10 million star systems ends with no results

A search for alien life in other star systems has come up empty-handed. A recent project named...

The post-inflammatory syndrome of COVID-19 is becoming more complex in children

After contracting the COVID-19 and recovery, the body takes its own time to get to normal. Unfortunately,...

FDA authorizes Abbott’s 15-minute, $5 COVID-19 card test ‘BinaxNOW’

Abbott Laboratories’ new technology might change the game in how the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is...

The new Fitbit Sense will detect how stressed you are

In the past, Versa has been the flagship for the Fitbit company, but no more for Fitbit...

Comment Below

The missing tomb of the last Queen of Egypt: Queen Cleopatra

The last queen of Egypt was Cleopatra, she killed herself with a snake bite, after the Roman...

COVID-19 kills more men than women. This may be the reason why.

When the global pandemic surpassed 200,000 globally, a striking pattern had been noticed by researchers. The fact...