Ocean soaks up more carbon than previously estimated

Carbon dioxide accounts for almost 80% of our greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Oceans and vegetations soak up a part of this carbon dioxide, and this phenomenon of carbon movement is known as flux.

Ocean temperatures slightly differ from the surface to depths of few meters below. However, previous carbon flux estimates have not accounted for this temperature difference, which plays a vital role in carbon dioxide solubility. A new study, led by the University of Exeter, factors in this temperature difference and found a significant net flux of carbon into the oceans.

- Advertisement -

The study is published in Nature Communications and titled, “Revised estimates of ocean-atmosphere CO2 flux are consistent with ocean carbon inventory.”

The study calculated the carbon dioxide fluxes from 1992 to 2018 and found up to twice as much net flux in certain times and locations when compared to uncorrected models. The researchers have recorded the near-surface carbon dioxide measurements in a database and are available to the scientific community and the public at “Surface Ocean Carbon Atlas.” This data can be used to calculate the carbon flux from the atmosphere into the oceans. 

Read Also: Global warming makes viruses more resistant to treatment, study finds

According to Dr. Jamie Shutler from the Centre for Geography and Environmental Science on Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall, the revised estimate agrees much better than previously with an independent method of calculating how much the ocean is taking up carbon dioxide. 

- Advertisement -

The researchers used satellite data to correct for these temperature differences and found a 10% uptake in the carbon flux by oceans.

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

Source: Phys.org

More from Science – News Landed

+ A unique molecule present in the venom of Honeybee can Kill Breast Cancer Cells, a study hints
+ Transposable elements regulate human nerve cells

Popular Stories – News Landed

- Advertisement -

+ Leader Mohamed Korim: One of Egypt’s greatest leaders
+ Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine Sputnik V has passed a small test

Related Stories

Methane gas found leaking from Antarctica’s seafloor, heating the Earth

This is a shocking new first-time finding. Researchers have discovered methane gas actively leaking from Antarctica's seafloor,...

New efficient technology to capture and reuse CO2 from industrial emissions

Greenhouse gases play a vital role in trapping heat in our atmosphere, without which our planet would...

Featured Stories

Venus: 10 shocking facts about our nearest planet you never knew

1. A day on Venus is longer than its year. It takes 243 Earth...

How to deal with COVID-19? A Zumba® Ambassador reveals the secret!

Keeping our mental and physical health in this difficult time has been, and it still is a...

Search for alien life among 10 million star systems ends with no results

A search for alien life in other star systems has come up empty-handed. A recent project named...

The post-inflammatory syndrome of COVID-19 is becoming more complex in children

After contracting the COVID-19 and recovery, the body takes its own time to get to normal. Unfortunately,...

FDA authorizes Abbott’s 15-minute, $5 COVID-19 card test ‘BinaxNOW’

Abbott Laboratories’ new technology might change the game in how the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is...

The new Fitbit Sense will detect how stressed you are

In the past, Versa has been the flagship for the Fitbit company, but no more for Fitbit...

Comment Below

Methane gas found leaking from Antarctica’s seafloor, heating the Earth

This is a shocking new first-time finding. Researchers have discovered methane gas actively leaking from Antarctica's seafloor,...

New efficient technology to capture and reuse CO2 from industrial emissions

Greenhouse gases play a vital role in trapping heat in our atmosphere, without which our planet would...