Study finds that watching nature on TV can lead to well being

A new study published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology reveals that watching nature on TV can contribute to the well being of an individual. The study also found that experiencing nature in Virtual reality will contribute more towards eliminating boredom and negative thoughts in people.

The research involved 96 participants who have induced boredom by watching a video of the supply chain. Afterward, they were made to watch underwater scenes of coral reefs either on TV or on VR with a 360 video or on a VR with a computer-generated graphics. The researchers found all of these viewing reduced the negative impacts and boredom activities, but virtual reality had the maximum impact. Experts say that this could be helpful for coping with stress in a population who are staying indoors for longer periods. Experts add that, especially in times like COVID-19, where people are confined to doors for longer periods can face stress for a longer time. So, nature programs can offer an accessible way for populations to get the benefit from the ‘Dose of Digital Nature’.

- Advertisement -

Read Also: Cloth masks also protect against COVID-19 if you clean them properly

One of the co-authors added that virtual reality could help us in the well-being of people who are reported to their beds due to prolonged illnesses. It will also help people to connect more with nature and act as a driving force towards protecting and preserve nature. The team worked with the BBC Natural History Unit to create their experimental conditions, which featured footages from the Blue Planet II series.

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

Source: MedicalXpress

More from Health – News Landed

- Advertisement -

+ Cloth masks also protect against COVID-19 if you clean them properly
+ Young brains get damaged on getting exposed to air pollution

+ Don’t call it a comeback: Iceland preps for the return of tourism
+ We are on our own. Seize the opportunity

Related Stories

Role of mucus in cystic fibrosis patients, a study reveals

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the lungs, digestive system, and other organs...

Diet drinks cause the same heart issues as other sweetened beverages, new study finds

Artificially sweetened beverages available under the "diet" branding, such as options from Coke or Pepsi, might be...

Featured Stories

NASA to launch delicate stowing of samples from asteroid Bennu

NASA's spacecraft OSIRIS-Rex that collected material samples from asteroid Bennu last week is leaking materials into space...

Methane deposits in the Arctic ocean are releasing greenhouse gases

Researchers have found evidence that large amounts of greenhouse gases are being released from frozen methane deposits...

Match 46 Oct 26: KXIP win and make the points table even more interesting

It's match 46 in the IPL, and it's a big match today. KKR takes on KXIP for...

NASA to announce exciting discovery about Moon

On October 26, at 12 PM EDT NASA will announce an exciting discovery about Moon from the...

Daily use of aspirin can lower the risk of COVID-19 death, study finds

A new study reveals that patients hospitalized for COVID-19 that take aspirin daily (low dosage) have a...

The peer pressure of a medical dream in India

If you are either born, studying, or working in India, you pretty much should have come across...

Comment Below

Role of mucus in cystic fibrosis patients, a study reveals

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the lungs, digestive system, and other organs...

Diet drinks cause the same heart issues as other sweetened beverages, new study finds

Artificially sweetened beverages available under the "diet" branding, such as options from Coke or Pepsi, might be...