Florida could get more rainfall during late summers – A new study suggests

A new study projects an increase in Florida’s later summer rainfall due to rising Atlantic Ocean temperatures. 

The researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, using a set of climate models, demonstrated the influence of human induces activities such as greenhouse gas emissions and industrial pollution on the rise in ocean temperatures. 

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The study, published in the early online edition of the American Geophysical Union’s journal Geophysical Research Letters, is titled “Identifying the Externally forced Atlantic Multidecadal Variability Signal through Florida Rainfall.”

(a) Map of the correlation between Atlantic SSTs and precipitation for June – October in GPCP (squares) and rain gauges (circles). (b and c) correlation between Atlantic SSTs and precipitation by month in nClimDiv (b) and rain gauges (c). Image: Jeremy Klavans

It is a well-known fact among the scientist community that Florida receives more rainfall in the decades when the North Atlantic waters are warmer than the average. However, the research team wanted to conduct an in-depth study so that the region can prepare themselves for a wetter future and possibly increased flooding. 

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The study, co-authored by Jeremy Klavans, Amy Clement and Lisa Murphy from the UM Rosenstiel School, and Honghai Zhang, a UM Rosenstiel School alumni currently at Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, shows a strong influence of ocean temperatures on Florida’s precipitation in late summer. This is the time of the year the region experiences the highest high tide events.

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According to Jeremy Klavans, “We know that humans are continuing to make North Atlantic waters warmer, so we expect an increase in late summer rainfall in Florida in the future.”

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Source: Phys.org

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