HIV in women can be prevented with an injection, study hints

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a chronic, potentially life-threatening condition caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It transmits sexually but also spread through contact with infected blood. Even now, there’s no effective cure for HIV/AIDS although several research paints on it.

Recently, a study considered as a boon for the modern world, especially in Africa. The drug Cabotegravir is found to be 89 percent more effective than Truvada pills in preventing HIV infections. ViiV Healthcare developed the most awaited drug. The usage of these drugs every 2 months is comparatively better than daily pills, although there are some side effects.

The study

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It included nearly 3,200 people in seven African countries. They were given random shots every 2 months of this drug or received the Truvada pills daily. They almost stopped the study when they observed only 0.21 percent of women who were given the shots acquired HIV rather than 1.79 percent of women on the pills.

Young women are more prone, as almost twice than men, to acquire HIV during the part of their life. This drug has enough potential to help those young women. The expected thing to do now is to make all the prevention medicines available throughout the world. Also, condoms usage helps to stops the spread, yet we need other choices to contain them efficiently.

Source: Aljazeera

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