Archaeologists… How do they know where to dig?

Archeology is a very important science in introducing us to past civilizations, and through the discoveries of archaeologists that have discovered them, we can learn about many things about those who lived in those places in past eras. However, how do archaeologists know where to dig?

Pottery fractures, bone remains, types of rocks, and soil layers were among the most visible and archaeologists’ evidence that this site contained antiquities. Therefore, archaeologists must have the geological experience that enables them to know the types of stones and soil layers in which they can determine the time to which the discovered artifacts belong.

- Advertisement -

 Archaeologists must also have good human relationships with the people who live in the areas they want to excavate because people can help scientists in many of their tasks if the relationship between them is good, and they can fail the scientists’ plan if the relationship between them is not good.

The methods of archaeologists have developed in recent periods, in order to carry out excavation and excavation operations, as they used modern technologies, including remote sensing, as this method can detect what is on the ground without uprooting the trees and weeds that cover the site. This becomes even more apparent when scanning with a laser and 3D images.

Using satellite technology, the situation began to further defined, as Google Earth helped reveal the remains of many ancient landmarks that were previously unseen through primitive survey methods.

Thus, archaeologists were able, through modern technology, to reach sites and areas that were not easy to reach in the past. Perhaps these modern methods will provide us with everything new about archeology after it is based on only primitive methods.

- Advertisement -

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

Source: Phys.org

+ The Pure Genius of Evil
+ A new app—the iGenomics—makes pocket size DNA analyzer possible

Related Stories

Ancient Umayyad lamps and bulbs discovered in Jerusalem

Ancient Islamic lamps and bulbs dating back to the early Islamic era from the seventh and eleventh centuries AD...

Despite COVID-19, will the recent archaeological discoveries in Egypt restore tourism?

There is no doubt that the year 2020 witnessed important archaeological discoveries that had not been discovered before, as...

Featured Stories

Sturgill Simpson Stops Struggling

Sturgill Simpson has always seemed to struggle. He would prefer being listened to as opposed to just being heard....

Climate change ultimately caused the demise of Transoxania

Climate change doomed the ancient Transoxania civilization, suggests a new study.  An international team of scientists analyzed sediment samples from...

Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico collapses

The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico witnessed the crash of its pathbreaking telescope on late Tuesday morning. One of...

Next Step: Jurassic Park? Scientists digitally reconstruct dinosaur brain

As the blockbuster Jurassic Park/World franchise taught us--despite being extinct for more than 60 million years--"Life finds a way", and there...

A tsunami-like mechanism in mice brains teach us more about migraines

A migraine with aura is a severe headache that accompanies symptoms like dizziness, zigzag line vision, blind spots, tingling...

Joseph R. Biden and Kamala D. Harris elected to the White House

At around 11:25 a.m. on November 7, 2020, after nearly 90 hours since polls first closed throughout the United...

Comment Below

Ancient Umayyad lamps and bulbs discovered in Jerusalem

Ancient Islamic lamps and bulbs dating back to the early Islamic era from the seventh and eleventh centuries AD...

Despite COVID-19, will the recent archaeological discoveries in Egypt restore tourism?

There is no doubt that the year 2020 witnessed important archaeological discoveries that had not been discovered before, as...