Archaeologist David Starbuck dies

Archaeologist Professor David Starbuck died at the age of 71, which he spent excavating antiquities until he was able to discover the history of the early American wars. David Starbuck died after he wrote 22 books on various archeology. Through his continuous efforts in digging and excavating forts and castles, he was able to gain knowledge of the early history of America.

David Starbuck graduated from the University of Rochester with a degree from Yale University, and Boston University awarded him the honorary professor honor after retiring four months ago.

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Starbuck has worked as a technician on Rogers Island since the 1990s and was able to find a lot of military remnants in the former settlement, a sight that once contained more than 16,000 soldiers. And he was able to find the military remains of soldiers and officers of metal; this is not the pieces of pottery and animal bones. This led to the revelation of military life at that time.

He was able to Starbuck through excavations of military regions around Fort William Henry in Lake George. In addition, his discovery of the well where the British payroll fund of 250 coins thrown into hiding from the enemy. Although he did not find the coin chest, he did find the bullets used and part of the rotating pistol used by the British forces during the defense of the fortress during the siege of 1757.

In addition to his finding many archaeological remains of the British and French military forces that were present in these places, he was also able to prove that the Native Americans had lived in this place long before the Europeans arrived.

Starbuck suffered from pancreatic cancer for a year and a half before his death, but he never stopped working and worked on archaeological excavation sites even a month before his death. When the pain intensified, he died, so everyone who knew him or dealt with him grieved him, especially those who participated with him in the multiple excavation operations.

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Rather, everyone who was associated with him, whether in academic studies or those who joined him in fieldwork in the excavations, missed him, especially because they were attached to him because he was keen to throw into them the love of antiquities. In spite of that, he was able to find a generation of scientists behind him to complete his scientific and field career.

A Starbuck friend says; He was dedicated to his career, traveling to his university in Plymouth to teach. In addition, he used to wake up early every day to announce that he was heading to the fight, he was like digging and drilling operations with fighting, and this was giving him and giving those around him more motivation towards work.

Starbuck was so loyal to his work that he did not even marry, he did not even have relatives, his father died a long time ago, and his brother drowned when his helicopter he was piloting crashed.

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