Blood feeding by mosquitoes several times increases malarial transmission

Malaria, a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that transmit through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquitoes. Precisely, the female Anopheles gambiae is primarily the active vector for the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. For instance, it increased the incidence rate to 228 million and resulted in 405,000 death in 2018.

Scientists cues that the infected vector, while feeding blood several times from the host, shortens the incubation period of the parasite. Also, it increases the transmission potential by accelerating the development of the parasite. Perhaps the vector mosquitoes consume blood every 2 to 3 days, providing the maximum possibility of transmission.

- Advertisement -

This study gives much desperation for people who are involving in mitigation strategies. Nonetheless, the genetically modified mosquitoes are a part of the control plan, yet there claims a red flag. These biologically modified mosquitoes were to bring down their reproductive performance but surpass the parasite growth effectively. Yet another interesting fact is the young mosquitoes are least susceptible to the chemical killing but rather carries the transmission potential.

So the conclusion is the younger mosquitoes and others with declined reproductive efficiency possess a strong implication on the transmission rate. Further study will improve the transmission feasibility and also the methods to control infection.

Source: Medical Xpress

Do you want to publish on Apple News, Google News, and more? Join our writing community, improve your writing skills, and be read by hundreds of thousands around the world!

More from Space – News Landed

- Advertisement -

+ Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico collapses
+ Asteroid turns out to be an old rocket – NASA

+ New threatening skin disease in dolphins is tied with changing global climate
+ Sturgill Simpson Stops Struggling

Related Stories

South Korea: 10 facts about the Asian country you didn’t know

1. It’s heaven for tech junkies. The country was judged to have the world’s fastest internet connection speed for the...

Transplacental transmission of the Zika virus gets untangled

The Zika virus disease is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that was first introduced in Uganda in 1947 in monkeys. Later,...

Featured Stories

Biden, Harris inaugurated as President and Vice President of the United States of America

On January 20, 2021, on the steps of the United States Capitol, history was made. Shortly before Noon EST,...

Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion plan: What does it mean to the world?

On Thursday (January 14), incoming President Joe Biden revealed his administration's US$1.9 trillion stimulus package that aims to combat...

Our Forests Will Reach Their Climate Tipping Point Decades Before the End of This Century

Recent observational data studies confirm that we are much closer to the temperature tipping point for forest and terrestrial...

Curfews sweep Europe to tackle rising COVID-19 cases

Nine months from the initial lockdowns, Europe grapples with record coronavirus cases. It comes as dozens of more contagious...

Endangered Indian rhinoceros calf born in Poland zoo

An endangered Indian Rhinoceros calf was born last week at Poland's Wroclaw Zoo. The female calf is said to...

Cancer cells hibernate like a bear to tackle chemotherapy

Hibernation is a process where animals go to sleep during an adverse environment. Precisely when animals don't get food,...

Comment Below

South Korea: 10 facts about the Asian country you didn’t know

1. It’s heaven for tech junkies. The country was judged to have the world’s fastest internet connection speed for the...

Transplacental transmission of the Zika virus gets untangled

The Zika virus disease is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that was first introduced in Uganda in 1947 in monkeys. Later,...